Movement Research
movement research is one of the world's leading laboratories for the investigation of dance and movement-based forms. Valuing the individual artist and their creative process and vital role within society, Movement Research is dedicated to the creation and implementation of free and low-cost programs that nurture and instigate discourse and experimentation. Movement Research strives to reflect the cultural, political and economic diversity of its moving community, including artists and audiences alike.

Organized by Wildcat! (André Zachary, Jeremy Toussaint-Baptiste and Eleni Zaharopoulos)

Wildcat!, a civically-minded, collaborative performance organization, brings together a panel of performers, artists, and activists to discuss how equitable conflict manifests in contemporary performance practices. How might the role of conflict be reconsidered within collaborative work? What potential lies in negotiating equitable conflict as a means of devising performance? As a means of shifting from militaristic ideas of conflict toward cyclical acts of supportive response?

Including Chloë Bass, Tiona Nekkia McClodden and Justine Williams

Direct download: Precarious_Collaboration_and_Equitable_Conflict_PODCAST.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:00am EDT

Nia Love re-configures and re-examines the meanings of ‘safe-space’, domesticity, and self care in an installment of her latest project, the Epic Memory Lab (EMLab). Taking the form of a potluck, Love will facilitate a candid dialogue about healing and aging that will be guided by the recipes, stories, and family heirlooms offered by attendees.

EMLab is informed by the structure of Kitchen Konversations, a series developed by Nia Love and Marjani Forté-Saunders.

 

Direct download: Nia_Love_Studies_Project.mp3
Category:podcasts -- posted at: 9:00am EDT

This conversation will take a detailed look at the culture around child-rearing as a performer. How do structures and attitudes in the field invite and support or discourage and overlook the choice to be primarily a dancer, rather than a dance-maker? In a dance economy focused on finding support for choreographers, what are the concrete ways performers are finding to navigate parenting and dancing?

Moderated by Nia Love 

With Anna Azrieli, Peggy Cheng, Heather Olson Trovato, Samantha Speis and Sarah White-Ayón

Direct download: Does_the_Dance_Field_Make_Room_for_Dancer-Parents_PODCAST.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:00am EDT